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Open-eLearning Beta Software Program

Free, open-source elearning editor

Open-eLearning Beta Software Program

As a member of the Open-eLearning Beta Software Program, you’ll be able to enroll your devices to access the public betas and try out the latest features.
You can provide feedback directly to Open-eLearning using the Feedback Assistant.

Become a free member Beta Program

OpenElearning_1.0.9_amd64.deb 52 Mo
OpenElearning_1.0.8_x64.dmg 58 Mo
OpenElearning_1.0.9.exe 44 Mo



As a member of the Open-eLearning Beta Software Program, you can take part in shaping Open-eLearning software by test-driving pre-release versions and letting us know what you think.

What is the Purpose of Beta Software?

Beta Open-eLearning serves one main purpose: to test performance and identify issues, sometimes called bugs.

Allowing beta testers to try out software and provide feedback to the developer is a great way for the program to get some real world experience and to identify how it will work when it's out of beta.

Just like regular software, beta software runs alongside all the other tools that a computer or device is using, which is often the entire point - to test compatibility.
Beta testers are usually asked to give as much feedback as they can about the beta Open-eLearning - what sort of crashes are occurring, if the beta Open-eLearning or other parts of their computer or device are behaving strangely, etc.
Beta testing feedback might just include bugs and other issues that testers experience, but often it's also a chance for the developer to take suggestions for features and other ideas for improving the Open-eLearning software.

Feedback may be given in a number of ways depending on the developer's request or the software that's being tested. This could include email, social media, a built-in contact tool, and/or a web forum.

Another common reason someone may intentionally download something that's only in the beta stage is to preview the newer, updated software.

Instead of waiting for the final release, a user (like you) could download the beta version of a program, for example, to check out all the new features and improvements that will likely make it into the final release.